Party: Royal Solomon Islands Police Force

Alternative Names
  • Police

Details

The first police in the Protectorate were eight men from Fiji who arrived at Tulagi in late June 1897 as an Armed Constabulary. They were actually Solomon Islanders from the labour trade who had lived in Fiji for some time and spoke Fijian. Among other duties, they served as crew on Resident Commissioner Woodford's cutter. The permanent police headquarters was built in January 1898, the frame from blue and red gum timber (imported from Australia), with an oregon wood floor (possibly from western USA, via Australia) and leaf walls. (AR 1897-1898, 12; British Solomon Islands Protectorate (BSIP) Handbook 1911, 23)

The Nggela Group, where Tulagi is situated, was already stable under an Anglican theocracy. In 1887, the Church of England's Melanesian Mission had established a Vaukolu, or 'meeting', which functioned as a local annual assembly of around 500 leaders, to begin civil and religious government. In January 1898,Woodford secularised the process, using the Vaukolu structure to invite the Nggela leaders to a meeting at Tulagi to consider a Nggela code of laws. One thousand people attended and the proposed code was accepted, based on one already in place in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Protectorate. The Resident Commissioner appointed district and village chiefs who were to send law breakers to Tulagi for punishment. Although nearby Savo was not initially included, according to Woodford, the leaders there volunteered to submit to the Nggela code of laws. (SIHE, entry for Vaukolu, Nggela Islands; AR 1897-1898, 14-15)

This allowed the Protectorate government to focus on the Western Solomon, the 'pacification' of which was ample justification for the next government bases, at Gizo in 1899 and in the Shortland Islands in 1906. Once Gizo was established, twenty-five local police were recruited from Malaita, Savo and Ysabel in November 1899 although they were not considered a success. (AR 1897-1898, 12; AR 1899-1900, 15) Each Resident Magistrate had control of their own small police force, and in the Western Solomons police were used primarily to combat headhunting. Resident Magistrate Arthur Mahaffy used the police under his control, armed with Martini-Henry rifles as his 'shock troops', successfully attacking the marauding headhunters, managing to bring some peace to the region. This was mainly motivated by the Protectorate administration's desire to encourage the establishment of coconut plantations. (AR 1903-1905, 34)

The next government base was established at Auki, on Malaita Island in 1909. A Fijian police officer, Ratu Waisele, was brought in to train the police on Malaita. Within a year, he asked to be sent back to Fiji. Resident Magistrate Edge-Partington reported that "he was frightened to go out in the sun", missed his wife (who had gone home because of illness), was scared of getting malaria, thought that he would die and did not "seem to have the spunk of an ordinary white child". Without the respect for a chief, which he could expect in Fiji, Waisele floundered. Securing adequate police was a perennial problem. (SINA, BSIP 14/7 RC CMW to RM W, 19 Sep1912) The first designated commanding officer of the Armed Constabulary was Frederick Melford Campbell (q.v), an Australian, appointed on 23 February 1912. Campbell also served as acting District Officer (the Resident Magistrate title changed to District Officer in 1914) of Malaita District on two occasions in 1915 and for short periods in 1917 and 1918, in addition to his police duties. Soon after, Campbell was appointed as District Officer for the Eastern Solomons, based on Makira, however in June 1919 he left government service and became a planter. Woodford attempted to recruit police from Fiji and Hong Kong, and also to get a force of sailors from the RNAS. When this failed, he settled for 21 men from Tana Island in the New Hebrides, who arrived in January 1912 on four-year postings. (Boutilier 1979a, 58; SINA, BSIP 14/41, 1911-13, RM to RC CMW, 1 Jan 1912) There was talk of replacing the Tana men with Indian police, who were budgeted for in 1915-1916. (AR 1915-1916, 7) In the end a local Armed Constabulary was expanded under Kings Regulations No. 6, of 19 June 1915, made up of Solomon Islanders.

The usual administrative pattern was that (except on Malaita 1912-1915) Resident Magistrates or District Officers were in charge of their own small police units. Police training was almost non-existent before the appointment of Campbell, and clearly the task of the Resident Magistrate on Malaita was easier once Campbell was there to back him up and train the police. Rather than always being on the back foot, the Malaita Resident Magistrate began to be able to enforce Protectorate law, at least around the coast. The situation was unusual: the Malaita Resident Magistrate had ultimate control over his district but could not interfere in the running of the police; and the Police Commander, in charge of the police for the whole Protectorate, rarely left Malaita. During the 1920s and 1930s, Tulagi was also an exception. In the other seven administrative Districts, the District Officers controlled their police, but in the Tulagi District (covering Tulagi, Makambo, Gavutu, the other islands of the Florida Group, and Savo) the commanding officer of the police also served as District Officer. However, the position carried no judicial powers, all count cases taken over by the Chief Magistrate. (AR 1925-1926, 4-5)

Thirty-three police, most of whom were needed to guard Auki, and one whaleboat, shared with the Resident Magistrate, were hardly sufficient to 'pacify' Malaita. The standards of the police were very different from today. In 1912, Charlie Kwaivania had just completed a two-year sentence for theft, and despite being noted as a cunning thief while a house servant, and a comment from Resident Commissioner Woodford that prison did not seem to be a deterrent, Kwaivania's intelligence led Campbell to appoint him as a police constable at a wage of £1 per month. (SINA, BSIP 14/7 RC CMW to RM W, 19 Sep1912; SINA, BSIP 14/41 1911-13, Minute from High Commissioner Sir Henry May on the duties of the Police Officer, 4 Nov 1911, 17 July 1912)

By 1922, the Protectorate constabulary had a strength of 153, with NCOs sent to Fiji for training. (Boutilier 1984b, 45) District police remained under the command of District Officers, or, at bigger stations, a Police Commander. Local police could rise through the ranks to sergeant or sergeant-major. In the 1920s, the Police and Prisons Department was administered by the Commandant (the officer commanding the Armed Constabulary), who also served as superintendent of prisons. He was assisted by a European sub-inspector of constabulary and a European gaoler.

The Police Commander in the second half of the 1920s was Captain Ernest Nelson Turner, who left in late 1928. His sub-inspector was Eustace Sandars who arrived in 1928 and became a long-serving Protectorate officer, remaining until 1942. By 1929, the Armed Constabulary personnel consisted of two sergeant-majors and 141 other ranks, and there were eleven warders attached to the prison at Tulagi. The headquarters was the training centre for all Protectorate police. The majority of the police were from Malaita, also the origin of most of the NCOs. In 1935, during the Great Depression years, the police establishment was reduced to the Commandant, 112 and two sergeant-majors, and in 1936 there was no sub-inspector. There were also fifteen local warders at Tulagi prison and one warder at each of the district prisons (AR 1927, 9-10, AR 1929, 10; AR 1935, 13-14; AR 1936, 16) Early police wore a khaki sulu (wrap-around cloth) with a cummerbund covered by a leather belt, the latter having been obtained as surplus from the Manchester police force, and dating back to the 1880s. The sergeant-majors wore a white cummerbund, sergeants wore a black cummerbund, corporals had a blue one and ordinary constables had a red cummerbund. There were also four small boy buglers and four small drummers.

The Commander or the sub-inspector was also Crown Prosecutor in the local court, with murder trails forming the majority of the work, held before the Chief Magistrate and a legal adviser, along with four assessors. In cases were the person was found guilty of murder the case had to go to the Court of Appeal in Fiji, and as there was no direct communication all court materials were forwarded via Sydney. A guilty verdict, which carried a sentence of execution, could take three months to finalise.

Prison facilities also came under the auspices of the Armed Constabulary. Tulagi had prisoners right from 1896, before there was a goal, and by 1898 there were twenty-one prisoners, most of them from Nggela. (AR 1898-1899, 16) Gizo prison was established soon after. The usual policy was that prisoners on long sentences were not kept locally. Prisoners from the southeast Solomons were sent to Gizo and northwest Solomons prisoners were sent to Tulagi, making escape more difficult. Executions of murderers occurred, the first recorded in the Annual Report for 1903-1905. Europeans were also imprisoned: one was in Tulagi prison in 1905, having shot a Solomon Islander. He served a sentence and also had to pay compensation. (AR 1903-05, 33-4) The 1918-1919 Annual Report shows that the Tulagi prison had been moved from the inner to the outer coast of Tulagi, which improved the health of the inmates. (AR 1918-1919, 3) The next year there were 82 prisoners on Tulagi with others on shorter sentences at the six police out-stations, where temporary lock-ups were in use. (AR 1919-1920, 3) In 1931, Tulagi' s prison consisted of one cell for Europeans, four other cells and four associated wards, together containing 94 prisoners. District prisons were built from local materials, but, as with Tulagi prison, were surrounded by barbed wire stockades. (AR 1931, 14; 1933, 14)

By 1922, the Protectorate constabulary had a strength of 153, with NCOs sent to Fiji for training. (Boutilier 1984b, 45) District police remained under the command of District Officers, or, at bigger stations, a Police Commander. Local police could rise through the ranks to sergeant or sergeant-major. In the 1920s, the Police and Prisons Department was administered by the Commandant (the officer commanding the Armed Constabulary), who also served as superintendent of prisons. He was assisted by a European sub-inspector of constabulary and a European gaoler. By 1929, the Armed Constabulary personnel consisted of two sergeant-majors and 141 other ranks, and there were eleven warders attached to the prison at Tulagi. In 1935, during the Great Depression years, the police establishment was reduced to the Commandant, 112 and two sergeant-majors, and in 1936 there was no sub-inspector. There were also fifteen local warders at Tulagi prison and one warder at each of the district prisons (AR 1927, 9-10, AR 1929, 10; AR 1935, 13-14; AR 1936, 16) Early police wore a sulu (wrap-around cloth) with a red cummerbund and a leather belt, the latter having been obtained as surplus from the Manchester police force, and dating back to the 1880s.

During the Second World War most of the police joined the Solomon Islands Defence Force and many became scouts and coastwatchers (q.v.). The Armed Constabulary was reconstituted after the war. Some of the early police were Station Sergeant Samson Sakobose, Corporal Benjamin Pidiri and Constable Simeon Nuno, all from Choiseul, who joined the force on 1 September 1946. Others were Constable Kikoni, Sergeant Jacinth Luta Kusilifu, Chief Warder Tertius Gwangi Babalu and Constable Elija Irotasi Tagina.

The first postwar Superintendent of Police, Frank Moore, an Australian, was appointed in July 1949, but only lasted one year, an alcohol-related departure, but also because the Armed Constabulary was a shambles and the task of reform seemed impossible without considerable recruiting of new expatriate police officers. Moore was replaced by Hugo Colchester-Wemyss, from the Palestine police in the pre-war years, who had also served in the West Indies and was looking forward to retirement, not to building a new efficient police force. He retired in 1956. In his early years, Colchester-Wemyss had only two senior officers, both sub-inspectors, Ronald Yates, who had been a post-war ex-Palestine Police Building Inspector, and Dick Richardson, of Black American and Solomon Islands descent. (Golden 1990, 290) All three were stationed at the Rove headquarters, and there were 210 sub-officers and constables. The Police Headquarters and the Police Depot and Training School remained at Rove. Detachments were also stationed at the various district administration centres. In addition to Honiara (later Central) Police Station, there were police stations at Auki and Malu'u in Malaita District and at Kirakira in Eastern District. Police detachments were also stationed at Gizo and Tataba in Western District. (AR 1949-1950, 30)

The new expatriate recruitments, which should have occurred in the late 1940s, did not come about until the early 1950s. The delay was probably because Britain was concentrating on Palestine and Kenya and other flashpoints considered more important than the far away Pacific Protectorate. Eventually, ten new expatriate officers arrived during the 1950s. In 1951, the Protectorate advertised for three officers from the United Kingdom, which enabled establishment of the modern Solomon Islands Police Force to replace the Armed Constabulary. The first of these officers, Inspector John Buckingham, arrived in February 1952, ex-London Metropolitan police officer close to retirement, to be based at Honiara Police Station, which also served all of Central District. The second to arrive was Alan Lindley, as a sub-inspector at the end of March 1952, with two more sub-inspectors arriving in June, Edward Bradley and James Semple. They were followed by John Holland early in 1953. Lindley was from Nottingham, and had done his National Service in the Royal Berkshire Regiment serving in Eritrea, and then as a constable in the Coventry City Police. The war had removed many middle-aged officers, enabling these young British men to advance rapidly in the colonial service. They were all in their twenties, and barely prepared for working in the Protectorate. Semple came from the Nottingham City Police and was also ex-Palestine in the post-war years.

Buckingham was moved from Honiara Police Station to Auki about May 1952, as commanding officer during the later years of Maasina Rule. Semple was soon posted to Malu'u in north Malaita. Soon after he arrived, Bradley, also from Coventry, was put in charge of the Police Training School and Central Prison. Lindley was transferred to Honiara Police Station (replacing Buckingham). He remembers his salary as Fijian £550 (about £500 Sterling) plus a 10 percent rent allowance. There was no uniform allowance, which made for difficulties as dress uniforms, which included a sword, were expensive. The jobs were far from standard police duties in the United Kingdom. The Superintendent of Police's position was still combined with that of Superintendent of Prisons and he supervised the Honiara Central Prison which was next to Police Headquarters at Rove. Lindley added Prison Officer and executioner at Central Prison to his duties (until the death penalty was abolished in 1959). He was also responsible for Honiara's fire services, which included the airfield. Later he was appointed as an Immigration Officer and was also responsible for firearms control and all traffic matters.

Thus, modern police force was created in the 1950s. The European commissioned officers all seem to have swapped around in different roles. Buckingham was unable to cope with his Malaita posting and was moved back to Honiara as officer in charge of Honiara Police Station and Central District. Bradley took over control on Malaita and Semple left Malu'u to replace Bradley at Police Headquarters. When at Honiara Police Station, Lindley tried to introduce standard police procedures such as a 'beat' system of patrols. He also reformed the work shifts and introduced a station diary system and a Case Reported Book. When Buckingham returned from Malaita, as part of wider staff movements, Lindley was posted to Gizo Police Station in charge of the Western District police. Sub-Inspector John Holland was also from the Nottingham City Police. In Honiara he was trained as a Customs Officer and was sent to Russell Islands to open a Police Station and Customs Office (given the importance of the Russells as a copra plantation port).

Gizo was an isolated post: there were only eight Europeans based there in 1953 and 1954, the other foreigners being the Chinese in Chinatown, led by Quan How Yuan. The only local people permitted to live within the Gizo boundaries were government employees. As Lindley remembers, supplies and mail arrived every six weeks when Burns PhilP & Co's. MV Malaita berthed, and most other communications with headquarters in Honiara were through an ex-US radio. Every fortnight a plane landed at Barakoma on Vella Lavella Island. In the 1950s, airmail communication with Honiara was maintained by two policemen paddling a canoe from Gizo to Vella Lavella, where they waited overnight, sent off the outward mail and returned with the inwards mail. Police tours out of Gizo and around the district were often for two weeks, by one of the small government ships, AV Nellie or AV Nancy, or by the larger MV Mary, a 18-meter-(60 feet)-vessel, and occasionally by canoe. The police officer's home was a large leaf house with no ceiling (except in the one bedroom) and a storeroom, kitchen and bathroom were attached by walkways. After complaints, in 1953 this building as replaced by a Nissan hut shipped up from Honiara and reassembled on a concrete slab base.

A new Queen's Regulation issued on 14 November 1954 renamed the force as the Solomon Islands Police Force and at the end of the year the approved establishment was eight commissioned officers and 200 sub-officers and constables. In reality, not all of the posts were filled and there were only six of seven commissioned officers. Police Headquarters and the Police Depot and Training School remained at Rove. Police formations were located at various district administration centres, and European Commissioned Officers were in charge of stations at Honiara, Auki and Gizo. Police officers were also stationed at Malu'u, at Yandina in the Russell Islands, and at Gizo and Korovo in Western District (opened in 1954). More emphasis was now placed on literacy for new recruits. Their height had to be at least 1.63 metres (5 feet 4 inches) and it was preferred that they be unmarried. The government reports suggest that in 1954 a start had been made to establish a Criminal Records Office at Honiara. This must have been 'window-dressing' as Lindley has no memory of this and says that the Criminal Investigation Division was not established until many years later.

The police uniform was a khaki sulu, a red cummerbund and black belt, with no shirt or shoes. Before shirts were common apparel (to which rank stripes could be attached), cummerbunds were light blue for corporals, white for sergeants and red and white in the middle of a fairly wide cummerbund for a senior sergeant or station sergeant. In 1952 Station Sergeant Wanebatha at Central Police Station in Honiara had a shirt with his rankings on the sleeve, and by the 1950s the sulus had become tailored, with cloth straps and buckles. When Honiara was chilly at night, duty police wore fuller European clothing. By the 1950s, on parade, on occasions like the Queen's Birthday, the indigenous police wore white jackets with their tailored sulus and red sashes. Expatriate officers wore normal colonial police uniforms in khaki with a leather sash from right to left, and on formal occasions such as parades they wore black trousers with a red stripe, tucked into half- Wellington boots, a white tailored top with a stand-up collar and a sash from left to right. White pith helmets with a pointed top and strap under the chin, along with a ceremonial sword, completed the outfit. Pith helmets were used until 1968, after which they were replaced by caps. The other eccentricity of early police officer formal uniforms was spurs, worn by officer of the rank of superintendent and above. (There were no horses.)

The relationships that developed between these 1950s British policemen and their indigenous police lasted for decades, well beyond their periods of employment. Alan Lindley described Station Sergeant Sakoboise as a fine policeman and Corporal Kusilifu from north Malaita as one of the finest men he had ever met. Corporal Babalu (also from north Malaita), from Lindley's Malaita years, by the 1960s had become the Chief Warder in Honiara and named his son Alan Lindley Babalu. Lindley took Station Sergeant Wanebatha with him to Gizo and Auki; he was the man who taught Lindley to drive using an ex-US Jeep and also taught him Solomons Pigin, in which he became fluent.

Administrative officers were in charge of the district prisons at Auki, Malu'u, Gizo and Kirakira. The prison at Tulagi and the prison farm at Ilu on Guadalcanal closed in 1949. In the mid-1950s, the Prison Service establishment was the superintendent and thirty local warders, with the capacity to expand to forty warders. (AR 1953-1954, 35) The size of the police force was increased in 1964 by the introduction of a Field Force and a Special Branch Unit. The Field Force supplemented the District Police Stations in patrolling some of the more remote islands and the hinterlands of the main islands. (AR 1963-1964, 57) The European officers often attended extra courses when they were back in the United Kingdom on leave. Lindley attended a "Fingerprint" course in 1957 and because he was in charge of the airport and fire services, he attended a "Initial Fire Training" course at Cardiff Airport in 1959. He was promoted to Assistant Superintendent of Police in 1959. In 1967 he was sent to a Senior Course at the Scottish Police College. Solomon Islanders also began to attend courses overseas. In 1966-67 a Solomon Islands assistant superintendent attended a course at the Police College, Bramshill, England, a station sergeant received instruction at the Hendon Police Training School in England, and a sub-inspector commenced detective training in Britain. One constable was sent to Port Moresby for a year's course in fingerprint classification at the headquarters of the Royal Papua and New Guinea Constabulary. This level of overseas training soon became routine. (AR 1966, 54; 1967, 61)

Until 1963, Honiara Police Station was still built out of scrap American materials, and Rove Police Headquarters was housed in large Quonset huts-big sheds with curved galvanised iron roofs with low eaves-also left over from the war. The 1960s saw a whole range of new government buildings built in Honiara, including a new Central Police Station and a new Police Headquarters and Training School at Rove. Today's Central Police Station opened in April 1963 and new accommodation was built behind it in 1966, consisting of a block for single men and eight married quarters. Rove Police Headquarters was rebuilt in late 1963 and the first Police Recruits' Training Course passing-out parade at the new buildings occurred on 3 June 1964. The examinations were of the same standard as those used in the United Kingdom; Constable Baekalia earned the top score. By 1966, the Solomon Islands Police Force comprised an establishment of ten gazetted officers and 275 NCO's and other ranks. (AR 1966, 54) In the early 1970s, there were fourteen police stations and posts within the four police districts. The headquarters remained at Rove, along with the Police Training School and the Police Mobile Unit. All police stations were linked by a radio network: Honiara, Gizo, Kirakira, Auki and Korovou had 100 watt base sets, while Munda, Ringi Cove, Yandina, Buala, Tulagi, Malu'u, Santa Cruz and Mohawk Bay operated through 15 watt Racal base sets. The Police Training School also trained constables for the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Protectorate and the New Hebrides. (AR 1974, 88-89)

Honiara was becoming more volatile in the late 1960s and early 1970s; the population was growing, and alcohol was easily available. Trade union activism, increased education, and new social and religious movements such as the Moro Movement on Guadalcanal and the Christian Fellowship Church in the Western Solomons, made policing more complex. This led to the formation in the 1960s of a Police Mobile Field Unit for bush patrols, which doubled as a Riot Squad, under Assistant Sub-Inspector Ray Viggor, an ex-captain in the British Parachute Regiment. It was later renamed the Field Force. Honiara's first riot occurred in 1965, when the police used tear gas to quell a crowd of mainly Malaitans who had marched from Kukum up past the Treasury building to Central Police Station, demanding that a man arrested at the Kukum Labour Lines be released. (Bellam 1970, 87)

In summary, the police force was reconstituted from an armed constabulary into the modern force during the 1950s and 1960s. There were several Superintendents, Chiefs of Police or Commissioners of Police (the title changed) during the Protectorate years; and their secondary title remained Superintendent of Prisons. Their deputies also carried the title of Inspector of Prisons. As noted above, Frank Moore, the first Superintendent of Police in 1949, was followed by Hugo Colchester-Wemyss until 1956. The next Chief of Police was Tom Handford, ex-military and ex- West Africa, with David Walford as his deputy, who later became New Hebrides Chief Police Officer. In 1959, the Chief of Police was 'Abe' Abraham, who had been a police officer in pre-war Palestine and then worked in the West Indies before becoming Chief of Police on Gibraltar. David Morgan was his deputy and replaced him as Chief of Police in December 1963. Alan Lindley became Deputy Chief of Police at that time. In 1968 there was an inspection of the Solomon Islands Police Force by Michael J. Macoun, CMG, OBE, QPM, the Inspector-General of Colonial Police, which led to Morgan and Lindley accepting previously offered severance packages. Morgan was replaced by Rodger Edwards between 1974 and 1978, who later became Assistant Police Commissioner of Hong Kong.

By 1968, three of the four police districts were commanded by Solomon Islanders. The first two senior Solomon Islander police officers were W.B. (Ben) Kiriau and Simon Siapu. Kiriau, a Malaitan, had joined the force in 1950, and by 1952 was a corporal, a sub-inspector by 1957 and a superintendent in 1968. At the time Morgan took over, Kiriau, who had trained in 1951 at Hendon Police College in the UK, was offered but declined the deputy's position. Siapu had a similar record of service and was the first to be promoted to superintendent. Kiriau was given command of Malaita in 1968. (NS 31 Jan.1968)

John Holloway, appointed as officer in charge of Special Branch in 1964, had previously worked in Northern Rhodesia, and was appointed Police Commissioner in 1978, with Ben Kiriau as his deputy. Holloway held the position through until 1982 when he was replaced by the first indigenous Police Commissioner, Fredrick Soaki from Tikopia, who held the position until 1995. Knighted for his services to the nation, Sir Fredrick was assassinated at Auki, Malaita in February 2003 during the 'Tension' years, partly because he had accepted the position of Deputy Commissioner of Police.

At the time of self-government in 1976, the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force consisted of Holloway as Commissioner, Kiriau as Deputy Commissioner, H. Brown as senior superintendent, Fredrik Soaki and B.S. Ward as assistant superintendents, eighteen inspectors, seventy sergeants, 272 constables, and sixteen administrative staff. 'Royal' was added to the title of the police force, confirmed on 27 April 1978 in a letter from British Foreign Secretary Dr David Owen to Governor Sir Colin Allan. In 2006 Governor General Sir Nathaniel Waena denied that the Royal title had been bestowed and demanded it not be used. Investigations showed him to be incorrect.
(Acknowledgement is due to Alan Lindley, John Holloway and Sir Peter and Lady Margaret Kenilorea, and Chief Superintendent Maxwell Saelea for assisting with the re-writing of the Solomon Police Force section during 2015.)

Police Band
The Police Band, formed late 1940s, always faced great difficulties. It was the main band used on all formal occasions in the Protectorate. None of its members could read music, they lacked confidence, and their instruments were in poor repair. In 1962, new instruments arrived from New Zealand and the band was rejuvenated by new Bandmaster John Kabwere, a Gilbertese who had trained with the Fiji Police Band.

Special Constables
The first forty Special Constables were sworn in at Rove on 13 March 1963: twenty-five Solomon Islanders, thirteen Europeans, and two Fijians. Their uniform was khaki shirts and shorts, and they paraded once a week in the evening, at the Fire Station. The Special Constabulary were only called out for duty on instructions from the High Commissioner, and were used for traffic duty, crowd control and other special circumstances. (NS 31 Oct. 1962, 31 Mar. 1963, 30 June 1964, 15 Oct. 1964)

Related Party

Published resources

Books

  • Tedder, James L.O., Solomon Islands Years: A District Administrator in the Islands, 1952-1974, Tuatu Studies, Stuarts Point, NSW, 2008. Details

Conference Proceedings

  • Boutilier, James A. (ed.), The Law of England Has Come: The Application of British and Custom Law in the British Solomon Islands Protectorate, 1893-1942, Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania Annual Conference, Molokai, Hawaii, 28 February to 3 March 1984, 1984b. Details

Reports

  • British Solomon Islands Protectorate, British Solomon Islands Protectorate Annual Reports (AR), 1896-1973. Details

Images

Title
Auki Police Station, Malaita Island, 1957 or 1958
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Image
Date
1957 - 1858
Source
Alan Lindley

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Members of the Police Force at Munda airport, 1950s
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Image
Date
1950s
Source
Patrick Barrett

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Police at Tulagi in the 1930s
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Image
Date
1930s
Source
Clive Moore

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Title
Police Headquarters, Rove, Honiara, 1952
Type
Image
Date
1952
Source
Alan Lindley

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Title
Police Headquarters, Rove, Honiara, 1952
Type
Image
Date
1952
Source
Alan Lindley

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Title
Police marching at the Queen's Birthday Parade, Auki, Malaita, 1959
Type
Image
Source
Alan Lindley

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Title
Police Station, Gizo Island, 1952
Type
Image
Date
1952
Source
Alan Lindley

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Title
Queens Birthday Parade, Rove Police Barracks, Honiara, 1973
Type
Image
Source
Brian Taylor

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Title
Queens Birthday Parade, Rove Police Barracks, Honiara, 1973
Type
Image
Date
1973
Source
Brian Taylor

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Title
Sir Fred Soaki, the first Solomon Islander Police Commissioner (1982-1996)
Type
Image
Date
1992
Source
Alan Lindley

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